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Steamy Steampunk Buildings

Started by MarcusJuliusCroft, May 04, 2012, 11:05:38 AM

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J. Wilhelm



The narrowest building in Mexico City.





The
building
on 8½
Venustiano
Carranza
Street
is said
to
have
housed
"El Malecón"
("The Pier")
restaurant
on the
first
floor.
Today
that floor is
a cellphone
repair
business.

morozow

#1376








Tomsk, Shishkov's house — Vyacheslav Shishkov, the author of the classic Soviet work "The Gloomy River", lived here in the 1910s. He stayed in Tomsk for almost 20 years: he worked as a technician, an engineer-prospector of waterways, participated in expeditions along Siberian rivers.

In the book "Wooden Architecture of Tomsk" for 1987, the house is characterized as follows: "Houses No. 10 and No. 14 on Shishkov Street were built at the beginning of the XX century... The architecture of these buildings also has features characteristic of the late XIX – early XX centuries, but the palace, majestic character of the buildings with huge, exquisitely decorated windows and cornices, gates, gates and courtyard facades distinguishes them from the general series of buildings of that time... Three-dimensional overhead carving decorating the end boards and sidewalls of the platbands, and openwork carving of the tympanum of the platbands and the frieze of the cornice create a unique game of decor. A special place is occupied by the sawn carving, which gives the building a special lightness and grace."
Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?

J. Wilhelm

Current location for a branch of the Irish-inspired casual dining chain "Toks" in Mexico City. The building was the private residence of local magnate Sebastián B. deMier, and his wife Guadalupe Cuevas Rubio deMier. The house was built in 1899 during the Porfiriato (Porfirian Era, I've heard some English-speaking historians call it), when the country had an open door policy for well to do European migrants, which massively pushed industrialization in the 20th C.

What a place to eat some cheap food and down a few beers!  Toks was a chain that started in the 1970s and inexplicably has managed to survive every since. Maybe they got a leprechaun looking after them.






The house in 1910 at the start of the Mexican Civil War (Revolución)


Sir Henry

I speak in syllabubbles. They rise to the surface by the force of levity and pop out of my mouth unneeded and unheeded.
Cry "Have at!" and let's lick the togs of Waugh!
Arsed not for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for tea.

J. Wilhelm

Quote from: Sir Henry on October 14, 2022, 05:17:56 PM
Quote from: J. Wilhelm on October 14, 2022, 04:56:54 PM


[Image]

Their logo fits the building as well as a bat in a soufflé!  :o

1970s logo on late Victorian Era building.

chironex


















Staying in the Hotel Claremont, South Yarra; another magnificent Victorian building falling apart due to inadequate care. The rest is up and down Toorak Road, near South Yarra Station.
No gel ball ban in WA! http://chng.it/pcKk9qKcVN

QUEENSLAND RAIL NOT FOR SALE!!!!!!

J. Wilhelm

A treat I just found online today. With a chunk of history to boot. I don't think I've posted anything about this beyond one or two casual photos without context before, so I'm surprised I'm finding this now with meaningful information to post. It just goes to show you old cities are a never ending source of surprise.

Source: Mercedes Díaz @mechediazortega on Twitter.

The San Rafael Foundation in Mexico City dates back to 1845, as a group of prominent architects, alumi from the San Carlos Academy, who built elegant mansions in a plot of land comprised of 8 city blocks. Most of the surviving buildings were built later during the Porfiriato Era (~1877-1911), which I've talked about before, during which there was a great increase in European migration into the country.






One of the largest building complexes, "La Privada Roja" ("the red gated street") in the area, housed the Italian embassy. Located right next to a railroad station, the complex built with bricks featured over 400 arches and solid pine wood doors.







Already a historical building by 1920, the property was purchased by Mexican engineer Luis Azcué, whose family kept close a relationship with other famous international migrants and Art Deco Era celebrities in Mexico, like Franz Mayer, Frank Sanborns, Diego Rivera and Gustavo Baz.







chironex

#1382
No gel ball ban in WA! http://chng.it/pcKk9qKcVN

QUEENSLAND RAIL NOT FOR SALE!!!!!!

chironex

No gel ball ban in WA! http://chng.it/pcKk9qKcVN

QUEENSLAND RAIL NOT FOR SALE!!!!!!

Sir Henry

I really like this one because it looks like they built the columns in order to support a rooftop garden. Then , once it was built, they thought it might be a good idea to fill in the rest of it underneath.

I speak in syllabubbles. They rise to the surface by the force of levity and pop out of my mouth unneeded and unheeded.
Cry "Have at!" and let's lick the togs of Waugh!
Arsed not for whom the bell tolls, it tolls for tea.

J. Wilhelm

Quote from: Sir Henry on July 09, 2023, 05:47:43 PM
I really like this one because it looks like they built the columns in order to support a rooftop garden. Then , once it was built, they thought it might be a good idea to fill in the rest of it underneath.



What period is this? Because there's a number of US late colonial era buildings that have the same look (flat rooftop with balustrade all around).  What would have been the largest sale ($3 mill) in our late grandfather's company involved covering the whole facade of a large reproduction mansion similar to that one in Houston. 

chironex

No gel ball ban in WA! http://chng.it/pcKk9qKcVN

QUEENSLAND RAIL NOT FOR SALE!!!!!!

chironex


The new ground-level storefront just doesn't work for me. And what does it do now? Roughly the same as the Jubilee Building next door.
No gel ball ban in WA! http://chng.it/pcKk9qKcVN

QUEENSLAND RAIL NOT FOR SALE!!!!!!

J. Wilhelm

#1388
Quote from: chironex on July 27, 2023, 09:11:44 AM

The new ground-level storefront just doesn't work for me. And what does it do now? Roughly the same as the Jubilee Building next door.

Yeah. That's s commonplace occurrence for buildings in Austin. There's no formal protection to historical buildings, so owners are free to adapt the building throughout the decades. What looked like a good idea in 1956, turns out to look horrifying to a 2023 observer trying to catch a glimpse of the past.

It's still a nice building, though.

J. Wilhelm

#1389
Which beings me to this next building. I don't remember posting anything about it before.  Hopefully I'm not wrong.


Paramount Theater in Austin, Texas.



The Paramount Theatre is a live / movie theater built in  classical revival style structure was built in 1915, in the Classical Revival Style.

From Wiki
Quote

The four-story theater was built by Ernest Nalle, who commissioned architect John Eberson to design the building in January 1915.[5] The theater opened under the name "The Majestic" on October 11, 1915, and hosted various vaudeville performers including the Marx Brothers. In 1930, the theater was purchased by Karl Hoblitzelle, who renamed it to the "Paramount Theatre" and added carpeting, upholstered seating, and the addition of a giant lighted blade sign reading "Paramount".[5] In 1941, the theater was purchased by the Margaret Reed Estate.[6] In November 1963, the building's facade received a renovation. The renovation included the removal and reprogramming of the signature blade sign. However, the sign was never re-installed and its fate was never revealed.[7]

By the 1970s, the popularity of television and suburban movie theaters led to a decline in theater attendance. In 1975, proprietors John M. Bernardoni, Charles Eckerman, and Stephen L. Scott formed a nonprofit group to restore the building, which was in deteriorating condition.[5] Local philanthropist Roberta Crenshaw, who owned a 50% stake in the building through her late husband's estate, donated her half of the trust to the nonprofit, meanwhile, the other half of the trust offered a 99-year lease.[6] In 1976, the theater's listing on the National Register of Historic Places qualified the venue for federal restoration funds. Renovations began in September 1977 following a $1.85 million grant from the federal government, which was also used to spur economic development in Downtown Austin.[5]

In 2015, the theater embarked on an effort to recreate the signature blade sign that was lost in 1963. Since there were no known architectural or engineering plans for the original sign, the designers analyzed old footage of the theatre that included the sign. On September 23, 2015, the blade sign was lit for the first time in over 50 years.[7]


Hurricane Annie

Quote from: chironex on July 09, 2023, 03:27:56 AM
https://flic.kr/s/aHBqjALFd5
What I saw in Maryborough last weekend.

Yhat is  Incredible  architecture. It was a creative era

Synistor 303

I love the contrast of the building next to it!!!

chironex



Flinders Street Station, Melbourne.
No gel ball ban in WA! http://chng.it/pcKk9qKcVN

QUEENSLAND RAIL NOT FOR SALE!!!!!!