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Dieselpunk & Atompunk Foods and Beverage

Started by Hurricane Annie, September 28, 2021, 04:27:42 AM

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Hurricane Annie


I found this article on exploding tea cakes on line. It would be a fun experiment.

Don't play with your food!!

https://www.atlasobscura.com/foods/exploding-teacakes?utm_medium=atlas-page&utm_source=facebook

What other foods and beverage  would fall under the diesel or Atompunk label? What would you serve up on the flight deck  or officers lounge?

J. Wilhelm

I think it's a good idea, just note you might have to somehow index the contents, as the list of alcoholic cocktails is absolutely endless. If we enter the mid 20th century, you will see an explosion of dishes and drinks. Not to mention that international and "fake international" dishes and drinks were popularized by the first ⅓ of the 20th century.


* I think you meant Beverages, Dear Annie.

Hurricane Annie

Quote from: J. Wilhelm on September 29, 2021, 04:32:48 PM
I think it's a good idea, just note you might have to somehow index the contents, as the list of alcoholic cocktails is absolutely endless. If we enter the mid 20th century, you will see an explosion of dishes and drinks. Not to mention that international and "fake international" dishes and drinks were popularized by the first ⅓ of the 20th century.


* I think you meant Beverages, Dear Annie.

*Auto correct led astray. I didn't think it looked correct.  I should have learned by know not to drink from the cup of passive acceptance. I've taken to double check with online dictionaries for meanings and spellings

Military men coming back from the world war fronts in exotic climes brought back a taste for "international cuisine". Both WW1 and 2,  Africa, Korea, Vietnam had a strong influence on Western culture and appetites


Don Beach  was a leading player in the Tiki style movement

https://www.foodrepublic.com/2016/10/24/inside-don-the-beachcomber-the-original-tiki-bar/

My grandfather spent  his military career in Africa, India and Middle East, before and after WW1. He died before I was born, after a long and colourful life. I never got to hear the tales 1st hand. There was no trace of anything exotic in my elderly grandmothers home or any trace of my grandfather's travels {bar a secret gin & tonic for medicinal purpose}. He did from family legend have a great yen for hot spicy foreign food. He insisted his wife put curry in everything  and had extra table spoons of the stuff on his meals. Apparently it was the mark of man, how hot he could handle the spices in his food; my father used to boast about his own attempts to meet his father's abilities

J. Wilhelm

For American servicemen the interaction with the East deepened during the Korean War, when Japan was a way station for troops, and later during the Vietnam War. Many Koreans and Vietnamese people came back with the soldiers, and hence their food. Vietnamese food is ubiquitous in the USA, only taking a place after Korean Indian and Chinese food (more or less in ascending order with Chinese food on top). Then there's Thai food and Japanese.

America got its first taste of widespread ethnic blending and intermarriage more or less after the wars in Asia (about a 300-400 year delay after Latin America)  and thus East Asian cuisine along with Mexican cuisine began a resurgence period among the general population in the last quarter of the 20th century.

Miranda.T

If it was British food in World War II then it's powdered egg, evaporated milk and lots and lots of spam.

Yours,
Miranda.

Hurricane Annie

Quote from: Miranda.T on September 30, 2021, 07:34:27 PM
If it was British food in World War II then it's powdered egg, evaporated milk and lots and lots of spam.

Yours,
Miranda.

New Zealand sent the majority of its meat, dairy, and green produce to Mother England  and the war effort. There was rationing here. Families were encouraged to "grow their own"  and many families had back yard poultry. There was black market meat, nylons  and other teadeable commodities. We had US army camps here, soldiers stationed for the Pacific war theatre. Favours of Chocolate, coacoa, fruit and army pants were popular with house wives. { I got pursed lips and blank stares when I asked elderly neighbours how their mums got army pants off the soldiers}

Rations of rice were saved for the Chinese populations in NZ. Potatoes  and bread were staples for the bulk of the country. Everything appears to have had raisins in it.

Mercury Wells

Oh...my old war wound? I got that at The Battle of Dorking. Very nasty affair that was, I can tell you.

The Ministry of Tea respectfully advises you to drink one cup of tea day...for that +5 Moral Fibre stat.