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Happy Allhallowtide 2022!

Started by J. Wilhelm, October 27, 2022, 03:24:47 AM

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J. Wilhelm

This is going to be a very busy weekend for me, full of happy and not so happy things to do. I'll spare the negative drama (or should I say news from my drama queen roommates) and instead post the good news, namely that a childhood acquaintance of mine is coming to visit me, during Halloween/ Día de Muertos, a holiday that is famous or rather infamous for the deeds of a pair of miscreants 39 years ago, who now get to see how they've aged during said period (now that's scary)

I doubt we'll be able to recreate our Halloween deeds without being arrested, but who knows what might happen this weekend? So go ahead and post your Allhallowtide deeds and misdeeds below.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=A6G46k-_5qM

J. Wilhelm

So nothing done for Allhallowtide?

Synistor 303

Down here it is cold and raining, but despite that, the birds are singing and the flowers are flowering and it does not look or feel like Halloween. It just isn't really done much down under.

mizzarrogh

I brought home some candy in case the neighbors children did show up, but i guess not much of those things are going to happen here either, there are mainly elder people living here those days and they want to celebrate the night of all saints so there will certainly not be any spookiness there at all beside the children. I am to busy with construction work on the farm an my wrists are acing from old carpal tunnel fatigue from my previous life so i am currently limited to how long periods i can sew by hand, but i want to make a witch dress or the white ladies of the Horn sisters some day, just for fun and i love to wear overly large funny looking hats if i can...  ;) :)

It's not that we don't like Halloween, it's just that it collide with the celebration of the night of all saints here which is the fundamental opposite of Halloween and that may upset a lot of elder and religious people, however, the younger generation born in the 90s seem to embrace it more. It's always fun to have another excuse make dresses and decorations in my personal opinion... :)


J. Wilhelm

#4
Quote from: Synistor 303 on November 03, 2022, 11:07:29 PM
Down here it is cold and raining, but despite that, the birds are singing and the flowers are flowering and it does not look or feel like Halloween. It just isn't really done much down under.

What do you mean? Cold and rainy is typical Allhallowtide weather! And you can imagine  imagine the birds are evil harbingers of death and the flowers are Cempasuchíl (Mexican Marigolds), the flowers for the Mictecacíhuatl, the Aztec goddess of the Dead!  ;)

Quote from: mizzarrogh on November 04, 2022, 11:57:33 AM
I brought home some candy in case the neighbors children did show up, but i guess not much of those things are going to happen here either, there are mainly elder people living here those days and they want to celebrate the night of all saints so there will certainly not be any spookiness there at all beside the children. I am to busy with construction work on the farm an my wrists are acing from old carpal tunnel fatigue from my previous life so i am currently limited to how long periods i can sew by hand, but i want to make a witch dress or the white ladies of the Horn sisters some day, just for fun and i love to wear overly large funny looking hats if i can...  ;) :)

It's not that we don't like Halloween, it's just that it collide with the celebration of the night of all saints here which is the fundamental opposite of Halloween and that may upset a lot of elder and religious people, however, the younger generation born in the 90s seem to embrace it more. It's always fun to have another excuse make dresses and decorations in my personal opinion... :)



That's very interesting because the celebration of the Day of All Saints was syncretized by the Catholic in Mexico with the Aztec rituals for the dead. The Day of the Dead (Actually two days, November 1 and 2) involve Mass at church after laying altars on the homes as well as cemeteries where the loved ones are interred. The pagan part of being the belief that the departed family members could come back to visit their relatives at certain times of the year, so very much a family affair. It's more of a celebration than spooking evil spirits as in the British tradition which comes from the Celtic Samhain.

http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,51402.msg1006660.html#msg1006660

mizzarrogh

That's interesting! I am only kind of familiar with the British ones and the north American one.
In Scandinavia it was not really introduced in that form until the 90s.

However, In the Easter celebration we did use the firecrackers and kids walked around and asked for candy dressed up as little witches (both boys and girls did whan i was a kid, i remember my mother helped me with rouge on my cheeks and lipstick and of course the head cloth that make the Easter witch a witch, the easter witches did not use those pointy hats, they used woman's head doaks instead, but of course a broom and a copper coffee pot (but the cat did not want to... ha ha).  :) ) The firecrackers where originally gunshots to scare away witches and evil.





J. Wilhelm

Quote from: mizzarrogh on November 04, 2022, 11:57:33 AM
I brought home some candy in case the neighbors children did show up, but i guess not much of those things are going to happen here either, there are mainly elder people living here those days and they want to celebrate the night of all saints so there will certainly not be any spookiness there at all beside the children. I am to busy with construction work on the farm an my wrists are acing from old carpal tunnel fatigue from my previous life so i am currently limited to how long periods i can sew by hand, but i want to make a witch dress or the white ladies of the Horn sisters some day, just for fun and i love to wear overly large funny looking hats if i can...  ;) :)

It's not that we don't like Halloween, it's just that it collide with the celebration of the night of all saints here which is the fundamental opposite of Halloween and that may upset a lot of elder and religious people, however, the younger generation born in the 90s seem to embrace it more. It's always fun to have another excuse make dresses and decorations in my personal opinion... :)

I'm constantly reading snippets of history from people I follow on Twitter, and it's interesting to note that holidays which seem to be unrelated sometimes are related in unexpected ways. Christianity in Europe and the Americas syncretized bits of ancient religion and myth (eg Alfar/Elves),  and moved celebrations (eg Samhain, Beltane/May Day turned into Walpurgis Night) to fit the Christian calendar or purposes during the conversion to Christianity...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Easter_witch
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walpurgis_Night

mizzarrogh

Yes, clearly  :) i am not sure how it is celebrated on the other side of the Baltic sea, but i know some of those, like the Easter ceremony are much bigger in North east Europe among native people and it seem to slowly fade away on the journey through Germany. Christmas is named "Jul" in Swedish by the way, i think it was originally on the darkest day in the winter, and Midsommar (midsummer) is the day when the sun newer goes down.